Antibiotic Resistance

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), if the current development continues, by 2050, 10 million lives are at risk every year due to antibiotic resistance (AMR). This can be compared to about 8 million people dying of cancer and approximately 1 million people in traffic accidents every year.1​

Antibiotic Resistance


 

WHO warns that the high and constantly increasing levels of antibiotic usage will lead to common infections such as tonsillitis and ear infections becoming very risky, even resulting in death, due to the lack of effective medication.2 The same applies to common surgical procedures and cancer treatments that rely on antibiotics to complement the patient’s own immune system.

Antibiotic resistance leads to longer hospital stays, higher treatment and medicine costs and increased higher mortality rates. To reduce the problem of antibiotic resistance, it is important that antibiotics are only prescribed when necessary.3,4​​

References:
1. European Commission. 2017. A European one Health Action Plan Against Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR).
2. Burke JP. New England Journal of Medicine, 2003, 348:651–656.
3. Allegranzi B et al. Lancelott, 2011. 377:228-241
4. Stijn Blot et al. Critical Care Medicine, March (2014) 42:3